WHERE DID YOUR FISH COME FROM?

At Salty Girl Seafood, it’s important to us that you have the information you need not only to cook seafood simply, but to make simple, informed decisions about the seafood you purchase. We work closely with our fishermen to ensure you are receive a premium, sustainably harvested product, complete with information about who, what, and where your seafood was harvested. And it’s all right here.


Fishing Community: Bristol Bay Bristol Bay, located in southwestern Alaska, is the home to the largest sockeye salmon run in the world. Last summer (2015), 58 million sockeye salmon were harvested from the fishermen that work in this region. These dedicated fishermen work around the clock during the season, which peaks over a few weeks during the summer. Due to the nature of this fishery and it's remote location, small native or family-run boats offload their catches to larger boats called 'Tenders' that transport the catches of many fishermen to the processing plant on land. Though traceability down to the individual boat is not possible, we work with several fishermen to bring you Bristol Bay's finest sockeye salmon. Interested in learning more? Bristol Bay has been under threat of the Pebble Mine for several years. Learn more at http://www.savebristolbay.org/

Fishing Community: Bristol Bay

Bristol Bay, located in southwestern Alaska, is the home to the largest sockeye salmon run in the world. Last summer (2015), 58 million sockeye salmon were harvested from the fishermen that work in this region. These dedicated fishermen work around the clock during the season, which peaks over a few weeks during the summer. Due to the nature of this fishery and it's remote location, small native or family-run boats offload their catches to larger boats called 'Tenders' that transport the catches of many fishermen to the processing plant on land. Though traceability down to the individual boat is not possible, we work with several fishermen to bring you Bristol Bay's finest sockeye salmon.

Interested in learning more? Bristol Bay has been under threat of the Pebble Mine for several years. Learn more at http://www.savebristolbay.org/

Sockeye Salmon Scientific name:  Oncorhynchus nerka Description: Sockeye has the reddest flesh of any salmon species, and its rich meaty flesh has a high oil content. Generally the further sockeye are caught from their natal river, the higher the quality.  (Source: FishChoice.com)

Sockeye Salmon

Scientific name:  Oncorhynchus nerka

Description: Sockeye has the reddest flesh of any salmon species, and its rich meaty flesh has a high oil content. Generally the further sockeye are caught from their natal river, the higher the quality. 
(Source: FishChoice.com)

Fishing Gear Type: Gillnet Gillnetting employs vertically hanging nets that are suspended by floats on the top line and are anchored to the seafloor or weighted on the bottom line.  Graphic: © Ocean Health Index

Fishing Gear Type: Gillnet

Gillnetting employs vertically hanging nets that are suspended by floats on the top line and are anchored to the seafloor or weighted on the bottom line. 

Graphic: © Ocean Health Index

Bristol Bay, Alaska Bristol Bay is the eastern-most arm of the Bering Sea, stretching 400 km long and 290 km wide at its mouth. The bay is one of the world's most valuable fisheries, providing 40 percent of America's seafood and supporting up to $2 billion in commercial fishing every year. 

Bristol Bay, Alaska

Bristol Bay is the eastern-most arm of the Bering Sea, stretching 400 km long and 290 km wide at its mouth. The bay is one of the world's most valuable fisheries, providing 40 percent of America's seafood and supporting up to $2 billion in commercial fishing every year. 

Why this fish? This fish is a recommended choice across sustainability metrics. Alaska salmon are well managed and fished using gillnet, purse seiners, and pole caught – all of which minimize bycatch and have minimal impacts on the environment.

Why this fish?

This fish is a recommended choice across sustainability metrics. Alaska salmon are well managed and fished using gillnet, purse seiners, and pole caught – all of which minimize bycatch and have minimal impacts on the environment.