WHERE DID YOUR FISH COME FROM?

At Salty Girl Seafood, it’s important to us that you have the information you need not only to cook seafood simply, but to make simple, informed decisions about the seafood you purchase. We work closely with our fishermen to ensure you are receive a premium, sustainably harvested product, complete with information about who, what, and where your seafood was harvested. And it’s all right here.


  Fishing community: Quileute Tribe This Coho salmon was harvested by members of the Quileute Tribe, located in La Push, Washington, on the shores of the Pacific Ocean. The Quileute Tribe has lived and hunted in this area for thousands of years, where fishing continues to be an integral part of native culture - as well as a source of income and subsistence - representing a vital part of tribal potlatches and other events to the tribe. Tribal youth are taught early on in their lives how to engage in both river and marine fisheries. Presently, Quielute natives live at the town of La Push on their treaty reservation which adjoins the south shore of the river at the mouth. Since the original 1974 Boldt decision (United States vs Washington) - a case which has been continually refined with sub-proceedings since that time - Quileute and other treaty tribes of Western Washington have been recognized as co-managers of the fishery resource with the state. Under the Boldt decision, harvest occurs only after sufficient fish are available to sustain the resource. Additionally, the tribe has demonstrated its commitment to salmon habitat restoration efforts both on and off-reservation within the treaty area (Usual and Accustomed Area), working with timber landowners and state and federal agencies to assess habitat status, prioritize projects, and implement restoration (including installing culverts to allow salmon to return to their natural spawning areas, fish passage repair, bank restoration) throughout the area.

 

Fishing community: Quileute Tribe

This Coho salmon was harvested by members of the Quileute Tribe, located in La Push, Washington, on the shores of the Pacific Ocean. The Quileute Tribe has lived and hunted in this area for thousands of years, where fishing continues to be an integral part of native culture - as well as a source of income and subsistence - representing a vital part of tribal potlatches and other events to the tribe. Tribal youth are taught early on in their lives how to engage in both river and marine fisheries. Presently, Quielute natives live at the town of La Push on their treaty reservation which adjoins the south shore of the river at the mouth.


Since the original 1974 Boldt decision (United States vs Washington) - a case which has been continually refined with sub-proceedings since that time - Quileute and other treaty tribes of Western Washington have been recognized as co-managers of the fishery resource with the state. Under the Boldt decision, harvest occurs only after sufficient fish are available to sustain the resource. Additionally, the tribe has demonstrated its commitment to salmon habitat restoration efforts both on and off-reservation within the treaty area (Usual and Accustomed Area), working with timber landowners and state and federal agencies to assess habitat status, prioritize projects, and implement restoration (including installing culverts to allow salmon to return to their natural spawning areas, fish passage repair, bank restoration) throughout the area.

  Coho Salmon Scientific name:  Oncorhynchus kisutch Description: Coho salmon have rich, reddish-orange meat and have been called one of the best tasting salmon. Although coho costs less than king and sockeye salmon, its quality is still quite high. Coho are a medium fatty salmon that have nearly two times the oil content of pink and chum salmon, but less than sockeyes or kings.  (Source: FishChoice.com)

 

Coho Salmon

Scientific name:  Oncorhynchus kisutch

Description: Coho salmon have rich, reddish-orange meat and have been called one of the best tasting salmon. Although coho costs less than king and sockeye salmon, its quality is still quite high. Coho are a medium fatty salmon that have nearly two times the oil content of pink and chum salmon, but less than sockeyes or kings. 
(Source: FishChoice.com)

  Gear Type: Gillnet Gillnetting employs vertically hanging nets that are suspended by floats on the top line and are anchored to the seafloor or weighted on the bottom line.  Graphic: © Ocean Health Index

 

Gear Type: Gillnet

Gillnetting employs vertically hanging nets that are suspended by floats on the top line and are anchored to the seafloor or weighted on the bottom line. 

Graphic: © Ocean Health Index

  Quillayute River, WA The Quillayute River is located on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington. It is one of many coastal rivers that have runs of coho and other Pacific salmon. The Quillayute is the current, traditional and ancestral center of the territory of the Quileute Native Tribe, which before European settlement occupied the entire drainage basin (plus that of the Hoh River).

 

Quillayute River, WA

The Quillayute River is located on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington. It is one of many coastal rivers that have runs of coho and other Pacific salmon. The Quillayute is the current, traditional and ancestral center of the territory of the Quileute Native Tribe, which before European settlement occupied the entire drainage basin (plus that of the Hoh River).

Why this fish? Coho salmon harvested by the Quileute Tribe are slightly unique in their management, as the salmon are managed and monitored in part by the Quileute Natural Resources Committee and Tribal Council, in addition to international and domestic agencies and organizations. The Quileute’s role in the management process includes extensive data collection in the field, followed by interagency negotiation on how to use that data to express the best harvest numbers for the forthcoming year, for each species. At an international level, Coho salmon are managed by the Pacific Salmon Commission (the United States, Canada, and treaty tribes), within which The Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, of which the Quileute Tribe is a part of, participate in the annual meetings to outline management measures for the upcoming salmon seasons. This process is then detailed further through the North of Falcon process with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) to determine how individual rivers and salmon runs will be monitored separately. Coho salmon are monitored by escapement (how many fish return back to the river) and must hit a certain number before fishing can commence. The Quileute Tribe is diligent in monitoring and also collects information on water quality to ensure that the Quillayute River is clean for returning salmon. Bycatch in this fishery is low and habitat impacts are minimal. Effects of hatchery fish (a common practice for sustaining wild salmon runs that operates as a nursery for wild salmon) on ecosystem dynamics are being studied on a large scale to ensure that these practices support wild salmon runs as oppose to affect them detrimentally. Coho salmon from coastal rivers of Washington are listed as a ‘Good Alternative’ or yellow rating on Seafood Watch.

Why this fish?

Coho salmon harvested by the Quileute Tribe are slightly unique in their management, as the salmon are managed and monitored in part by the Quileute Natural Resources Committee and Tribal Council, in addition to international and domestic agencies and organizations. The Quileute’s role in the management process includes extensive data collection in the field, followed by interagency negotiation on how to use that data to express the best harvest numbers for the forthcoming year, for each species.

At an international level, Coho salmon are managed by the Pacific Salmon Commission (the United States, Canada, and treaty tribes), within which The Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, of which the Quileute Tribe is a part of, participate in the annual meetings to outline management measures for the upcoming salmon seasons. This process is then detailed further through the North of Falcon process with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) to determine how individual rivers and salmon runs will be monitored separately. Coho salmon are monitored by escapement (how many fish return back to the river) and must hit a certain number before fishing can commence. The Quileute Tribe is diligent in monitoring and also collects information on water quality to ensure that the Quillayute River is clean for returning salmon. Bycatch in this fishery is low and habitat impacts are minimal. Effects of hatchery fish (a common practice for sustaining wild salmon runs that operates as a nursery for wild salmon) on ecosystem dynamics are being studied on a large scale to ensure that these practices support wild salmon runs as oppose to affect them detrimentally.

Coho salmon from coastal rivers of Washington are listed as a ‘Good Alternative’ or yellow rating on Seafood Watch.