WHERE DID YOUR FISH COME FROM?

At Salty Girl Seafood, it’s important to us that you have the information you need not only to cook seafood simply, but to make simple, informed decisions about the seafood you purchase. We work closely with our fishermen to ensure you are receive a premium, sustainably harvested product, complete with information about who, what, and where your seafood was harvested. And it’s all right here.


  Coho Salmon Scientific name:  Oncorhynchus kisutch Description: Coho salmon have rich, reddish-orange meat and have been called one of the best tasting salmon. Although coho costs less than king and sockeye salmon, its quality is still quite high. Coho are a medium fatty salmon that have nearly two times the oil content of pink and chum salmon, but less than sockeyes or kings.  (Source: FishChoice.com) This fish is a "summer coho" - a true coho that behaves like a sockeye. There are several small stocks of these fish in southeast Alaska. They return to lake systems from early (June) through mid-summer (early August) and hold in the deep cooler waters of a lake. This is the same life history pattern most often used by sockeye…except the summer coho may hold longer than sockeye before spawning. In late October through mid-November, they leave the deep water of the lake and spawn in the lake’s tributaries. In essence they spawn at the same time the far more common fall coho spawn. After emergence from the gravel, the juvenile fish return to the lake where they rear for at least a year before going to saltwater. They are unique in other ways: they enter freshwater with high fat content and “set” scales. Summer coho are generally in better condition when caught than a fall coho; they have stopped feeding in saltwater, scales are set and not easily lost, and the fish have greater fat content which makes them desirable to knowledgeable consumers. (Source: http://ssraa.org/neck-lake/)

 

Coho Salmon

Scientific name:  Oncorhynchus kisutch

Description: Coho salmon have rich, reddish-orange meat and have been called one of the best tasting salmon. Although coho costs less than king and sockeye salmon, its quality is still quite high. Coho are a medium fatty salmon that have nearly two times the oil content of pink and chum salmon, but less than sockeyes or kings. 

(Source: FishChoice.com)

This fish is a "summer coho" - a true coho that behaves like a sockeye. There are several small stocks of these fish in southeast Alaska. They return to lake systems from early (June) through mid-summer (early August) and hold in the deep cooler waters of a lake. This is the same life history pattern most often used by sockeye…except the summer coho may hold longer than sockeye before spawning. In late October through mid-November, they leave the deep water of the lake and spawn in the lake’s tributaries. In essence they spawn at the same time the far more common fall coho spawn. After emergence from the gravel, the juvenile fish return to the lake where they rear for at least a year before going to saltwater. They are unique in other ways: they enter freshwater with high fat content and “set” scales. Summer coho are generally in better condition when caught than a fall coho; they have stopped feeding in saltwater, scales are set and not easily lost, and the fish have greater fat content which makes them desirable to knowledgeable consumers.

(Source: http://ssraa.org/neck-lake/)

  Neck Lake This wild salmon comes from the waters returning to the Neck Lake Hatchery in Southeast Alaska. The Neck Lake Hatchery is a unique project - it's a hatchery in a lake, a raceway that seines, and coho salmon that behave like sockeyes. Salmon are raised in small pens in the lake until they are ready to head to sea and released. Currently, about 1.7 million summer coho salmon are reared and released in Neck Lake. After their time in the ocean, they return and are caught by commercial fishermen with gillnets or harvested by the hatchery to help pay for the project. Roughly 60% of the fish are caught commercially and 40% are harvested by the hatchery.  (Source: http://ssraa.org/neck-lake/) Gillnetting employs vertically hanging nets that are suspended by floats on the top line and are anchored to the seafloor or weighted on the bottom line.  Graphic: © Ocean Health Index

 

Neck Lake

This wild salmon comes from the waters returning to the Neck Lake Hatchery in Southeast Alaska. The Neck Lake Hatchery is a unique project - it's a hatchery in a lake, a raceway that seines, and coho salmon that behave like sockeyes. Salmon are raised in small pens in the lake until they are ready to head to sea and released. Currently, about 1.7 million summer coho salmon are reared and released in Neck Lake. After their time in the ocean, they return and are caught by commercial fishermen with gillnets or harvested by the hatchery to help pay for the project. Roughly 60% of the fish are caught commercially and 40% are harvested by the hatchery. 

(Source: http://ssraa.org/neck-lake/)

Gillnetting employs vertically hanging nets that are suspended by floats on the top line and are anchored to the seafloor or weighted on the bottom line. 

Graphic: © Ocean Health Index

  Ketchikan, Alaska These fish are offloaded at or transported directly to processors in Ketchikan, Alaska, where they are frozen immediately to preserve their freshness and healthy nutrients. (Source: http://ssraa.org/neck-lake/)

 

Ketchikan, Alaska

These fish are offloaded at or transported directly to processors in Ketchikan, Alaska, where they are frozen immediately to preserve their freshness and healthy nutrients.

(Source: http://ssraa.org/neck-lake/)