WHERE DID YOUR FISH COME FROM?

At Salty Girl Seafood, it’s important to us that you have the information you need not only to cook seafood simply, but to make simple, informed decisions about the seafood you purchase. We work closely with our fishermen to ensure you are receive a premium, sustainably harvested product, complete with information about who, what, and where your seafood was harvested. And it’s all right here.


  Fishermen These fish come from a small organization founded by two commercial fishermen in Southeast Alaska on a mission to sell the highest quality, sustainable salmon caught by fishermen who harvest responsibly. These salmon were caught by Captain Ron Sparks of the F/V Growler, Captain Norm Hughes of the F/V Chilkat, and Captain Fred Bigsby of the F/V Rustler

 

Fishermen

These fish come from a small organization founded by two commercial fishermen in Southeast Alaska on a mission to sell the highest quality, sustainable salmon caught by fishermen who harvest responsibly. These salmon were caught by Captain Ron Sparks of the F/V Growler, Captain Norm Hughes of the F/V Chilkat, and Captain Fred Bigsby of the F/V Rustler

Why this fish? At an international level, Coho salmon are managed by the Pacific Salmon Commission (the United States, Canada, and treaty tribes). Because the Taku river crosses between the United States and Canada, government agencies in both countries work together to manage the salmon fisheries and ensure that certain amounts are harvested in each country and enough fish remain in the rivers to support healthy populations for future generations. Roughly 2 million salmon of all species are produced by the Taku each year. Coho salmon are monitored by escapement (how many fish return back to the river). Scientists and managers are diligent in monitoring at several locations around the Taku and work throughout the year to make sure management targets are hit. Bycatch in this fishery is low and habitat impacts are minimal. This fishery supports several jobs in the local community, including fishermen, seafood companies, and government authorities. Coho salmon from Alaska are listed as a ‘Best Choice’ or green rating on Seafood Watch. This fishery is also certified by the Marine Stewardship Council.

Why this fish?

At an international level, Coho salmon are managed by the Pacific Salmon Commission (the United States, Canada, and treaty tribes). Because the Taku river crosses between the United States and Canada, government agencies in both countries work together to manage the salmon fisheries and ensure that certain amounts are harvested in each country and enough fish remain in the rivers to support healthy populations for future generations. Roughly 2 million salmon of all species are produced by the Taku each year. Coho salmon are monitored by escapement (how many fish return back to the river). Scientists and managers are diligent in monitoring at several locations around the Taku and work throughout the year to make sure management targets are hit. Bycatch in this fishery is low and habitat impacts are minimal. This fishery supports several jobs in the local community, including fishermen, seafood companies, and government authorities.

Coho salmon from Alaska are listed as a ‘Best Choice’ or green rating on Seafood Watch. This fishery is also certified by the Marine Stewardship Council.

  Coho Salmon Scientific name:  Oncorhynchus kisutch Description: Coho salmon have rich, reddish-orange meat and have been called one of the best tasting salmon. Although coho costs less than king and sockeye salmon, its quality is still quite high. Coho are a medium fatty salmon that have nearly two times the oil content of pink and chum salmon, but less than sockeyes or kings.  (Source: FishChoice.com)

 

Coho Salmon

Scientific name:  Oncorhynchus kisutch

Description: Coho salmon have rich, reddish-orange meat and have been called one of the best tasting salmon. Although coho costs less than king and sockeye salmon, its quality is still quite high. Coho are a medium fatty salmon that have nearly two times the oil content of pink and chum salmon, but less than sockeyes or kings. 
(Source: FishChoice.com)

  Gear Type: Gillnet Gillnetting employs vertically hanging nets that are suspended by floats on the top line and are anchored to the seafloor or weighted on the bottom line.  Graphic: © Ocean Health Index

 

Gear Type: Gillnet

Gillnetting employs vertically hanging nets that are suspended by floats on the top line and are anchored to the seafloor or weighted on the bottom line. 

Graphic: © Ocean Health Index

  Taku River, AK The Taku River is a trans-boundary river, flowing from northern British Columbia into southeast Alaska near Juneau. It originates from a vast watershed that has been left in a pristine condition. There are many tributary rivers and streams, mostly fed by glacial runoff, which is a perfect environment to support all five species of Pacific Salmon.

 

Taku River, AK

The Taku River is a trans-boundary river, flowing from northern British Columbia into southeast Alaska near Juneau. It originates from a vast watershed that has been left in a pristine condition. There are many tributary rivers and streams, mostly fed by glacial runoff, which is a perfect environment to support all five species of Pacific Salmon.